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Solar Sailor is done!

I've submitted a "completed" version of Solar Sailor to the Ludum Dare website.

Play the finished game

It's been an intense 48 hours but really satisfying now that I'm at the end of it. There's loads more I would have done if I had time, but there some things I was pretty happy with too. I'll post a more complete post-mortem here in a couple of days... once I've had some sleep.

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